Memorizing Biology

How can i memorize these informations in Biology using Mind Palace or other techniques for example

Characteristic features of Phylum Arthropoda

  • The body structure shows bilateral symmetry.
  • They are triploblastic.
  • They can be found in all types of habitats – land, water and soil.
  • They have jointed limbs.
  • The body is segmented into three regions – Head, Thorax and Abdomen.
  • The body cavity is filled with blood and is called the haemocoel. The blood is white in colour.
  • The exoskeleton is hardened and is made of chitin.
  • They have a well-developed central nervous system.
  • The head is well developed and bears the sensory organs and brain.
  • They have compound eyes and mosaic vision.
    thanks for your future help :smiley:
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It’s a 10-item list, so you could use a 10-location memory journey (a.k.a., the method of loci) or a 10-item peg list.

Here’s your list with numbers:

  1. The body structure shows bilateral symmetry.
  2. They are triploblastic.
  3. They can be found in all types of habitats – land, water and soil.
  4. They have jointed limbs.
  5. The body is segmented into three regions – Head, Thorax and Abdomen.
  6. The body cavity is filled with blood and is called the haemocoel. The blood is white in colour.
  7. The exoskeleton is hardened and is made of chitin.
  8. They have a well-developed central nervous system.
  9. The head is well developed and bears the sensory organs and brain.
  10. They have compound eyes and mosaic vision.

I would extract a few keywords from each line and create mnemonic images for them. I’ve added some example images.

  1. bilateral symmetry – example image: I would picture a leaf that was used as an example in college.
  2. triploblastic – use an image borrowed from an illustration
  3. all habitats – picture the habitats at that location
  4. jointed limbs – picture limbs with wooden joints or something to emphasize the joints
  5. head, thorax, abdomen – picture a cartoon illustration of an arthropod that only contains those three parts
  6. haemocoel - white blood – picture a haemocoel filled with white blood at that location
  7. chitin exoskeleton – picture an empty exoskeleton at that location
  8. well-developed central nervous system – you could borrow an image of the actual nervous system
  9. well developed head: sensory organs and brain – picture some sensory organs and brain
  10. compound eyes, mosaic vision – picture eyes made of a mosaic

Then place the images for each line at locations in a memory journey. You could use an image of an arthropod as the memory journey. Here’s an example using a lobster:

(The legs are similar in that image, so you might want to move a couple of locations to the tail, or chain the images together with the story method – I memorized it by chaining the images using a story along the locations in the image above.)

If you haven’t used the method of loci yet, see the How to Build a Memory Palace page for an introduction.

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Thanks Josh …I’ll try that and if I face any problem i’ll tell you …Thanks bro

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I’d draw a simple cartoon outline of a lobster in my notes and scribble an image next to each point. (That’s what I did while writing my post, but I thought that the other illustration would look better than my sketch. :slight_smile: )

After you can recall it without looking back at your notes, move on to the next task. You can then go back to your notes later and review the memory journey a couple of times before your test to make sure that you can still recall the list.

While reviewing, I’d imagine that someone is quizzing me on the characteristics of arthropods, and I would explain the list to them like I’m teaching them (see the “Feynman Technique” page). Being able to explain the information helps ensure an understanding of the material.

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Hi all memory masters!

I would like to ask you for advice - like my colleague Ahmed I too study biology and quite often have to learn basic information about different species like name, area of presence, enviromental conditions, appearance, common behaiviour, alarm voice + singing, nesting… about 10 questions per one species. Answers for these questions are usually quite simple, but when you have to learn basic info about hunders of different animals it gets confusing.

Currently I usualy read a presentation/text book and make one card with all questions in form of cloze deletion notes + one or two pictures for every species directly in Anki. It works, but I am getting overwhelmed by a lot of questions and I feel there must be a better and more effective way.

I am thinking about A) imagination and visualisation of every animal in situations related to the questions (well but is it enough?) B) draw a picture of every animal in situations related to the questions (it will be a lot of drawing - time consuming?) C) tryining using loci method - but I don’t know if I should find specific loci for every species… it will be a hell lot of locis…

Any advices appreciated! Regards,

Mirek

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Lynne Kelly has an interesting technique for memorizing birds with a lukasa that might provide some ideas.

Heres an idea … since you have already made cards
For the anki cards which are hard to remember you can make a journey for that particular species as described above…you can attach the said journey to that card

Welcome to the friendliest forum on the planet, Mirek!

I use a lukasa for the 412 birds of Victoria, the state in Australia where I live (now more like 430, because I’ve added the introduced birds and vagrants), as indicated by Josh’s comment above. If that interests you, I am happy to explain more or discuss the way I do it.

Basically the beads are families, the scientific names memorised through puns and stories. I then use stories for the species within a family, each bird becoming a character. Those of the same genus are ‘brothers’. The stories encode ID, behaviour, habitat, distribution and so on, every growing in complexity as I add more information. I sing the calls if the calls are of consequence, or dance if the movement is relevant. So I sing the kookaburra, but dance the sanderling. The first has a distinctive call, the second is a small sandpiper who runs up and down with the waves in groups, but their call is little use in ID.

This gives me a checklist of birds so I can use a process of elimination when out in the field. That’s really useful for the large groups such as the 36 honeyeaters in Victoria - the most diverse group of birds in Australian habitats.

Have fun deciding which system to use!

Lynne

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Dear all,

thank you for all advices.

@userrname: Yeah, I am thinking about using Anki cards to note the QA (in some subjects I use cards for writing down all my notes instead of separate notes) as well as the journey/story which I am using during learning. Good hint!

@Lynne I admire your skill :slight_smile: more than 400 birds, wow! Using singing, dancing or other physical activities is perfect idea, I am definitely going to try it!

About lucasa board, in my case I am currently trying to learn more information about bird species I already know, but I need to keep more detail information about them. I am practising kind of a story method (well I belive it’s story method) - I try to imagine every specific bird in set of situations related to the questions I am trying to remember. (bird seeing himself in the mirror, eating something, buiding nest, migrating to south…)

What do you think about this approach? Or is more effective for my mind to connect is with real world - e.g. place in my mind every bird in a real-world loci in a nature around my house (bench for feeding, corner of my garden for nesting…) and let him act here?

(And if so… is it allowed to re-use same loci for more specieces? Like image every bird feeding at the same bench… Or is this even more confusing for my memory? Becouse due to same location different species blend together?)