Reversing the negative affects of technology on my brain

I know this seems counter intuitive as im currently doing this on a computer but I have read lots of info suggesting that devices harm your brain and decrease your intelligence. any info you have on this could help. so my plan is simple. sell my xbox reduce my screen time to maybe 4 hours at most all day ( not including checking time.) and leaving my phone at home as much as I can. im also going to get a decent mp3 player for music. im going to work on mental math and memory techniques with a sort of tutor named daniel timms and spend more time reading. sadly im scared its too late and my brain is permanently fried. I have spent so much time gaming my brain may be screwed. problem is I still want to watch movies and youtube as I find it nice. any advice and information (im a 15 year old male)

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Funny thing is… if you watch your Netflix show or what have you in a foreign language, all of a sudden it’s good for your brain.

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They really do not. The problems due to technology are a lot more functional problems. For example, frequently scanning text instead of reading it, which also makes you default to actually scan text rather than read it. You train yourself to do this, for example, you may think about your phone every odd minute rather than stay on track.

These are the sort of things that get ‘fixed’ by simply not doing them. They also do not directly have anything to do with the technology but rather how you use it.

With my earlier statement, you should sell your xbox if you do not benefit from it. Reducing screen-time, physically has more to do with eye strain, you would benefit more taking frequent breaks than you would reducing the overall time.

no comment.

I am certain I have spent more screen time playing games than you. I have even spent multiple 3 day all-nighters playing games in the past. I am also certain I have spent a lot more screen-time than you have in general. My brain is not fried in fact it has been beneficial for me. Games/screen-time really does not fry your brain and some jobs require you to be in-front of a screen for over 8 hours everyday.

I have seen many people playing games who may assume they have been negatively affected by it (ironically). It is always the case that they are living their gaming habits in their daily lives. For example, a vast majority of gamers actually ‘rush’, in turn when they do anything else they also rush, they often skim over questions and whatnot academically.

My advice for you is that you should not fear screen-time and instead pay more attention to what exactly it is you are doing. You may notice habits such as skimming rather than reading, even when you do intend to read text normally. These are the sort of things that can have a negative impact and can be fixed when you carefully pay attention to them.

Similarly, with screen-time, when you are watching something, simply having images flash by your head without any thought, where you are hardly stimulated, is not going to bring much that is positive. Equally so, if you are not mindlessly watching without stimulation, it can be very much beneficial for you, even if it is a full day binge.

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28 years old and still learning. There are many many people across who also expanding there brain plasticty by trying to learn new things. You just have to be curious.

You are not familier with much of the world or what is going around you because you are not paying attention. Thats why this is coming from you at such a you age.

Do not be hard on yourself afterall you are in this world for just 15 years. Spend more time reading books of various genre. If you could not stay away from digital world, then watch documentaries and other things. Go outside. Go to trips. Go to foreign countries once a year.
I am sure you have not even touch 1% of the all the things and knowledge that this world can offer to you .

You have just stopped playing games recently and it could feel like slumber. but thats ok as your brain is still processing all the habitual activities. Take your time and start afresh.
Believe me you are fine and you just need little rest. Rest for few days and start exploring again.

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You might be interested in this discussion:
Digital Minimalism: “Why We’ll Look Back at Our Smartphones Like Cigarettes”

I haven’t read his other books, but they look related.

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Well, like one the previous posters said, it’s about being aware of the habits you’re forming and sustaining through constant repetition. If you need a more active recommendation than that, consider dopamine detoxing(haven’t tried it myself yet so ymmv) or meditation or yoga or a martial art. Any of those will draw you out of your automatic mode and give you the focus and the emotional distance to view yourself objectively.

I dunno about technology shaping my brain, I was more worried about my lack of productivity and how hollow I felt my many little entertainments to be. But I didn’t make any progress in adjusting those til this year, though there were many attempts

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IMO the biggest threat to your brain from technology is the huge amount of utter ■■■■■■■■ that is passed around as credible information. From amateurs producing videos on history and science to outright fraud like perpetual energy machines and insistence that the Earth is flat. News is delivered with heavy editorializing that plays to your favorite prejudice. Even in topics like sports or crafts, the amount of bad information is astonishing.

I check everything. Everything. Or I hold it in some doubt. People just repeat what their friends or favorite pundits are saying. Nobody seems to check sources. Most people have no clue how to test their beliefs or check their facts. They adopt beliefs the same way they buy clothing - if it’s comfortable and fits their self image, they buy it.

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you know that is a somewhat positive answer thats why I hate adults saying its bad for you I just decided to give it ago because it feels like im on auto and am worried it will affect learning mental math and stuff.

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You’re only 15. Get the right habits dialed in now and your brain will be in spectacular shape.

I started learning all that stuff at the age of 45. I’m benefiting a lot. Your brain stays plastic at any age.

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Have yet to read the article but I’ve long felt that smartphones are a terrible design. They are the proverbial 10lbs of s*** packed into a 5lb bag.

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Pornography , i saw nothing more harmful than this.

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From what I know demending strategy game can on long run be profitable.( at least grand strategy games helped me to understand geopolitics). I used to read tons of books, and I still like to sometimes do so, but from wise Internet research one can learn a lot. (Especially if one find contradicting statements) it can improve critical thinking and ability to connect facts. It is ofcourse bad for eyes, but in moderation can be useful.

Definetely, i created a 500+ pdf library just because internet.

Without it i couldn’t afford any of them.

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Devices are amazing. Consider wikipedia, news, email, typing documents, talking to people far away, read some kindle. Love technology. We be technologin right now in this forum

I think I know what you mean, the “overdose” of stimulation without the quiet peace in nature

Yes I do feel you. There’s a time for mental stimulation and there’s a time for quiet peace. What about a balance? Like, I learn from tech-internet devices and take a break outside or lay down on the grass somewhere and appreciate the sweet outdoors. What do you think?

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