Johannes Romberch's Congestorium Artificiose Memorie

Here is a guide which seems promising. Unfortunately, to begin with, there does not seem to be a master of classical Latin here. And then very rare books and dictionaries are necessary and “but anyone wishing to engage seriously with the study of Medieval Latin will find that a knowledge of French and German is absolutely necessary.”

Anybody up for it ?

I found a few descriptions of images and images from it and I am very curious.

I for one would be surprised if there were not even one hidden gem to be found.

http://individual.utoronto.ca/shamighosh/latin.htm

Why do you want to bother with the Latin version when there is a perfectly fine Italian translation that is much easier to read?

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:grin: any Italians can confirm that this is readable and comprehensible ?

And anyone is a buyer of rare memory books ? 5000E

There are two for sale on Abebooks

Also, anyone passing by the New York public library can borrow one to look at, for use in the library that is.

Yes. Pretty readable to me and I don’t even know Italian that well… I got lucky that there’s a digitized version of the text in Italian with notes about archaisms and references that the book makes. The Latin text would be readable just as the Italian were it not for the medieval mess. There are a few “letters” that I don’t even recognize and they abbreviate quite a lot of stuff, especially those with q in them, like quisquis, and also write an ~ instead of n or m for some words. Very annoying to read. Apparently, there’s also a digital version in Latin of this book and Ravenna’s Phoenix, I couldn’t find any though.

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