Why are you interested in studying memory techniques? [POLL]

Here’s another poll – are you interested in memory techniques for use in memory sports and/or are you interested in memorizing real facts for use in your everyday life?

  • I’m interested in memorizing random data for memory competitions
  • I’m interested in memorizing real facts for use in everyday life
  • Other (please comment below)

0 voters

2 Likes

I meant to click “other” too, but I can’t easily change my vote. I think the visualization techniques are useful for intentionally changing one’s thinking.

6 Likes

Yes, this is an aspect that I’m interested in too. I just read a book called Speed Reading with the Right Brain.

Its premise is that if you read with your senses then you experience and comprehend and remember more. So if you read the words “the red telephone box” with only the logical left brain you don’t get the same experience visualising it with taste, touch, smell, colour, etc, and intentionally bringing up some kind of concept about it like its association with Dr Who…

So the idea of actively visualising recruits more parts of the brain, even when used in high speed reading.

I practice a technique called Eyebody which was created by a guy who was legally blind but learnt how to restore his vision. It includes visualising in the upper visual cortex at the upper back part of the head. That’s where the brain sees and experiences the world with much more depth and richness and sensory integration. It has greatly enhanced my experience of seeing and I’m beginning to apply it to mnemonics and reading too.

5 Likes

I use memory techniques mainly for work and study. Playing on Memory League has helped me increase my speed and efficiency, which helps with studying and also keeps me motivated.

3 Likes

My main goal is to understand the human mind, especially the memory which I believe to be one of the main drives behind why we do the things we do.

That is also why I like to experiment with things, to see what works (for me) and what doesnt.

9 Likes

I memorized a ton of Sanskrit and it changed my thinking beyond anything I could have imagined.

Based on these experiences, I’m even more convinced than before that we don’t need to understand things before memorizing them - which is often the advice that is given.

9 Likes

Other. I am a student.

2 Likes

Apart from not requiring understanding, in what ways has memorising Sanskrit change your thinking?

1 Like

Others. I am interested because I want to pass time and because I like memory techniques.

2 Likes

Do personal passwords count as “real facts”?

6 Likes

Laws
Eg article x of law y is about z.
Lists of more or less related things.
Word by word articles content, the more literal the better.

3 Likes

Like what metivier said, and Joshua talked about it in his book, we are a product of what we remember, we sometimes we don’t do the the that help us because we have forgotten about them.

2 Likes

I’ll like to know more about that

1 Like

Other.

Maybe constant memorizing and visualizing will delay dementia. And maybe not.

Thanks.

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I’m with Josh on this. Sometimes I learn of ideas or even discover ideas that change my thinking in important ways. I want to hold on to these insights and have tools for intentionally coming back to them again and again.

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I’d like to hear more about this too. Really fascinating.

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Me too. I am a learner.

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I find things are even easier to understand if you have memorized them, it lets you look at the whole picture a little better.

4 Likes

Other: To imorove my memory to the point where I feel good about it.

“Other” my only interest is really to use it for study …and maybe to ‘repair’ some of the damage done to my memory by decades of alcoholism and god awful early evening German comedy cop shows (my wife’s favoured fare, I stress!). Yes ‘Soko Wismar’ and ‘Soko Spaetzle’ I am looking at YOU!

1 Like