What would be the best way to organize mind palaces in your head?

I have been thinking of trying to get better at mind palaces and use them throughout the day for memorizing, but I have trouble remembering the mindnpalaces themselves. Does anybody organize their mindpalaces themselves? If someone could help me with this that would be awesome!

Never had that problem before. Can you describe more specifically what exactly you can’t remember about them?

Like Pikachu, I’m not certain I understand the problem you’re having. I do keep a list of my memory palaces in Apple Notes on my iPad/iPhone. But I’m guessing your issue is something more than simply not remembering how many palaces you have or which ones house which information.

Are you having trouble remembering your actual route through your memory palaces? If that’s the case, I’ll say that I think it’s important—and I don’t think everyone here would agree—that your memory palaces be based on actual, physical places that you know very, very well. To my way of thinking, that’s the whole point of using a memory palace; because you know every space within it, it quickly and almost effortlessly triggers the memories associated with them. (So, no, I don’t ever use imaginary spaces or spaces that only exist on paper or in games.) If you’re forgetting the actual route through a space, it may be because you’re trying to remember the space itself in addition to remembering the associations.

It can be helpful, when possible, to somehow link your memory palaces to the things you’re memorizing. For example, if you’re memorizing a lot of detailed information or lists related to education, maybe your memory palace is your university. If you’re memorizing authors and books, it would make sense to store that information in a memory palace built on a library that you know.

Finally, “walk through” your palaces as often as possible, so they—and their contents—become even more familiar.

Hope there’s something here that can help!

Bob

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I suggest you write down your memory palaces on a journal. Review them everyday for a few minutes for a week or so. Eventually it will become easier to recall your palaces. But like other users mentioned above, try using areas you’ve visited or know very well.

Good luck

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I agree with a lot of what Bob said. I use mostly places I know well, but I have been using imaginary palaces. When I decide to use a made up palace, I draw it out, know the number of loci in each room and rehearse it without the mnemonic images a few times first. I then input the images and write out the story on a file on my computer so I can go back for review. So far it has been just as effective for me as palaces of actual places.

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I’m naturally nostalgic/sentimental, so I especially enjoy linking information to homes and places from my past. Even though I’m reciting US States, I get to walk through my grandmother’s house—which no longer exists—when I do it. Best Picture winners give me the chance to revisit my childhood home now that my parents are gone and the house has new owners. So, old homes/old neighborhoods make the memory techniques that much more appealing to me.

Assuming I keep memorizing stuff, there’s going to be a point when I run out of nostalgic journeys and need to change things up. But walking repeatedly through an imagined location—one without any memories of its own—doesn’t appeal to me…yet.

(I should add that I memorize purely for enjoyment. I’m not competing at all. If I were, I think I’d have to be much more clinical about this.)

Bob

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