What to do when you don't have any ideas for a marker?


#1

Greetings everyone!

I’m new to creating memory palaces, and i wish to practice it using poems, but I have some problems creating markers for this section:

“You can have whatever you want, just not necessarily in physical form.
The only reason you want what you think you want, desire what you desire is so you’ll feel different, better, more whole, more complete than you do now. From a place of incompleteness, you seek completeness in the world of objects.
What you’re really seeking isn’t actually the object, it’s the state you’ll be in when you finally “have” the object - that sense of release, relief, completeness, connection to life and love. You’ll be able to rest, finally, your seeking at an end. What you’re really seeking, then, is the end if seeking, that sense of being completely still, and present, and fulfilled, in the eternal Now […]”

My idea for the first marker is a person i know in the lotus position with a happy face next to another person i know with a sad face holding a golden jar with a hole in his chest, but I feel like I only remember parts of the beginning by doing so. I have no idea how to create markers for the next lines.

I feel like it is too “abstract” for me to create markers. Maybe I have to practice my creativity? What is your advice for when you don’t know how to create the markers?

Thanks for taking your time reading this.


(Werner Peters) #2

That is a challenge. I am a beginner myself. I will follow this thread to see what others say. I am also challenged with abstract expressions that I want to remember.


(Josh Cohen) #3

If you post a few examples of words that you’re having rouble with, we could help brainstorm some mnemonic images for them.


#4

Thanks, Josh. I have managed to remember the first 3 lines, but I have no idea how to remember from “What you’re really seeking isn’t actually the object[…]” to the end.


(Josh Cohen) #5

Verbatim text is tricky. (See previous discussions on memorizing verbatim text.)

I would use repetition. If you have a lot of text to memorize, you could break the text into phrases and assign an image for each phrase. A memory journey could help keep the phrases in order, if it helps.

Here’s an example of how it could be broken up, with some possible keywords in bold:

What you’re really seeking isn’t actually the object,

it’s the state you’ll be in when you finally “have” the object -

Look for patterns like consonance: r-r, c-c, l-l:

that sense of release-relief, completeness-connection to life-and-love. [dashes added]

You’ll be able to rest, finally, your seeking at an end.

What you’re really seeking, then, is the end of seeking,

10 iambic feet – I would repeat it while tapping out the meter, one “foot” per finger:

that sense of being completely still, and present, and fulfilled, in the eternal Now

Edit: mnemonic images tend to be personal, but here are some examples of images I might use:

  • seeking → heat-seeking missile
  • object → a JavaScript object: {}
  • state → a US map of the states or a state capitol
  • have → a half of an orange or similar fruit
  • rest → a rest stroke (used in classical guitar playing)

#6

Thanks for the detailed response. I really appreciate it.