Should/can I use menemonics for exams?

Hi! I am a 17 year old student who have read “Moonwalking with Einstein” by Joshue Four. The book really captured me by all the concept about memory techniques. So my questions is, is it wise to use those techniques for exams? (I am mainly studying science-subject so, Biology, Physics, Math and Chemistry and as well some languages, ex Spanish and more) Or would it be a “waste of time” to deep dive into learning all this techniques instead of actually studying more for the exams? No matter what, I will still dive deeper into this mnemonics world. I was just wondering if should mix this with my school subjects or not? :slight_smile:

My goal really is to study smarter and not harder, so would this really help me achieve that?
I as well want to compete in mnemonics (I know I have high goals, but I am really fascinated by this new world and would love to challenge my self with it!) But how am I supposed to train for the competitions? Does anyone have any guidance? I already have some books from Dominic O’brien, but if anyone has any more book tips, than I would really appreciate it.
(Sorry for my mes of structure…I am just have so many questions….)

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As someone who started when I was your age, I would say yes. Using mnemonics in a real-life situation is a good training opportunity since you’re actually using mnemonics for something you would usually use them for in the first place.

As for training in competitions, you can make use of Memory League. Pretty much every memory athlete has used it at one point. Or you can use the Memoriad software.

Yes, thank you. I already new some answers to my questions, but just needed it conformation by someone who already is into the mnemonics community. Thanks! Just have to start practicing than~ :slight_smile:

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I hope you will do better in studying as well as in competition.

Most school and real-world studies are best learned by understanding rather than memorizing. Usually when you understand how something works, you get a deeper understanding of the subject as a whole, and furthermore there is very little left to memorize, which will stick in your brain auomatically.

However there are some things that don’t fit this pattern, such as memorizing the order of the Chemical elements, the electromagnetic spectrum, and other arbitrary series of factual information like this. There are probably especially many examples in Biology and Medicine, and most of all in Pharmacology. In these cases, when understanding doesn’t get you do far, then definitely try applying mnemonic techniques! As you say, you should study smart, not hard, and that includes using tools like memory palaces and flashcard decks when the situation is right.

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Thanks! :blush:

Thank you for taking the time to enhance me with quick tips. True, when we have the grip in an material there really is no need for memorizing much. Hm, so I really just have to structure up my approach while studying, depending on the material. So the key-points, truly learn the material and than later strengthen my retrieval of the material with the help of mnemonics.

Aside from this site, this guy knows a thing or two about applying memory techniques in school.

To learn how to effectively study check out: https://www.learningscientists.org/

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