Reintroduction


#1

I am a big fan of Dr Anthony Metivier’s Magnetic Memory Method; however, I have been using mnemonic techniques for a few years now partcularly the Major mnemonic method combined with simple memory cubes or places.

For massive amounts of memory tasks I use a public transit method combining memory cubes at street corners and bus and subway/metro stations.

I never run out of memory palaces. In fact I have too many!

:wink:


(Silvio B.) #2

If only I could say the same, haha :grin:


#3

It is a common feeling SilvioB, because we are often plagued by two mindsets - a mindset of paucity where we feel that we must have a perfect “palace”. And a mindset of poverty or reductionisms, where we feel our places aren’t “good enough”. The trouble is in thinking that memory spaces are in fact “palaces”. They can be anything from granpa’s outhouse to your school bus to actual films or plays.

The reason we got the notion of palace in the first place is that it was a translation of θησαυρός, handed over to Cicero and his rhetorician friends and handed down to us.

θησαυρός means essentially storehose, and storehouses are to keep things. In this case, thesaurus comes down to us as memory palace in which we store mnemonic images.

But it can be pretty simple:

Start with your favourite room and make memory spots in each corner (corners can be spots 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 in the middle of the room. In the ceiling I put 10, which transitions me to another cube (kind of like the Clue/Cludo game), which by the way can make an excellent memory palace!) The walls of the room are even numbers: 2, 4, 6, 8 (like I say 10 is a transition to the next cube).

If you have a high school or university, you have a plethora of memory cube locations. If you take a bus a train a bike or walk to and fro you have plenty of places for your memory cubes.

Just try to make the cubes in memorable locations. How about turning Niagara Falls into 10 quicjk facts about water conservation? Or the Eiffel Tower into 10 French sayings? Also make sure you use REALLY outrageous comic or scatological images.

Anything goes. With practise and persistence you will surely get there. Go for quick wins and easy stuff. Then up your game!

Have fun!


(Josh Cohen) #4

By cube do you mean something like the one below? I use that pattern for square rooms, starting at the left near corner (where I’m standing at the door at position #8). I didn’t think about linking them by the 10th location, but I’ll try it. I try to place things from top to bottom, so I put location #10 on the floor.


#5

Pretty much; but I have thought of a bit of an improvement especially for the mathematically minded.

Instead of 10 on the floor if we start with zero/hero we would end with 9/twine/wine on the ceiling. When you dissolve to the next cube you are at 10.

The idea of the memory cube also goes back over the years; and I found it quite powerful.


(Josh Cohen) #6

Starting journeys at zero is an interesting idea.

I learned about that layout (and memory techniques in general) from the book Mind Performance Hacks. I used to put 10 on the ceiling, but then found it was more consistent with my system to move it to the floor.


(Silvio B.) #7

I think that cube pattern could work for some types of information. But I think if I want to memorize something quickly (like on memory league) it wouldn‘t be as easy to use as a journey with more distinguishable locations.

I will try it for laws I need to memorize though, because there I have lots of information to memorize and there‘s no need to be fast :slight_smile:


#8

Starting journeys at zero is an interesting idea.

Yes - we have the idea of Ground Zero. And because you are applying it to discrete and memorable locations it works fine. It also works with the Wardrobe Method or Animal Alphabet method. For example, if you wish to learn ten words in a Roman alphabet language for each letter just associate the cube to a letter of the Alphabet. From Aardvark to Zebra, or whatever your animals are.

If you want to do this with Arabic, then go from Alif (For me, a little Elf (aleph) wearning an Alif hat to the diacriticals like Hamza.

If you want to use Major Method in you cubes it’s pretty simple, too.

I learned about that layout (and memory techniques in general) from the book Mind Performance Hacks

I have not read it, but I hear very good things about it. The “Memeory Cube” has been associated to a man named Vaughn; I read an article about it somewhere, and likely there are Youtube demonstrations.


#9

I think that cube pattern could work for some types of information. But I think if I want to memorize something quickly (like on memory league) it wouldn‘t be as easy to use as a journey with more distinguishable locations.

Likely so. I am a real “slow coach” so speed memory is not my thing. Also, I have attention and focusing issues, so while I might train for that, likely I will leave it to those who are truly enthused by it.

This technique lends itself well to those who wish to recall lists of items (like Laws, for instance), speeches, poetry (I use it for Psalms, Proverbs, Shakespeare, etc.)

It is also pretty good for books in that you can have as many memory locations as you have chapters, then commit the top 10 things to memory from each.

Usually that is all you need.

For memorising rapidly lists of chaneable items, cards or stock ticker prices or something, then you need to have a linear journey, and follow some of the masters’ ideas like Alex Mullen.

I am likely as far from Alex Mullen as one can get! :wink: