New techniques

I have actually known and made some of my own techniques which don’t seem to be known yet. As such I thought I would share some of what my greed to photographic memory has brought out as techniques. This is especially since I have more techniques now and should start pressuring myself to make more techniques again.

First a very simple technique that may already exist is my morph system. Essentially this works by using an image, lettering, word and number that you see. You then morph it into something that looks relatively close to it. This is kind of like the shaper system but more of an emphasis on the morphing part which doesn’t entirely ‘require’ looking close to the original. Without using a memory palace this then yields a memory of around double or slightly more of what your normal memory would be. The real benefit to this is with overwriting existing memories. This is because when you morph your images, overwriting or deleting memories becomes much easier (that is morph to overwrite or delete).

Now some more interesting techniques:

Parallel memory palaces. The principle of this is relatively simple. Perhaps this is because I make my own memory palaces. Essentially you traverse more than 1 location at a time. At first this is difficult but once you slowly do it without switching it becomes easier. After a while you can start doing it with 3 locations then 4. By the time you reach 4 locations, 2 locations become more or less the same speed as 1 location each. The way I do it is by making multiple locations at the same time. This is kind of in a split screen format but, I use a more sticky note screen format for each location ( I just find it works better than a precise 4 screen split).

This also occurs with arithmetic. When you start practicing to add 2 digits at once without using the memory of the 2 digit result and rather the single digit result. You start becoming better at doing so and it will feel more natural and easy. As a result you also do not task switch. If you keep adding 1 digit at a time you will never really learn how to add 2 digits at once. Therefore it makes sense that this isn’t well developed. Generally it starts out in the format of an 40% : 40% of a split and starts getting to 70% : 70% split which is faster than 100% of a single process at a time. I find this is best learned slowly first. This is to avoid learning task switching and also for forming the right synapse.

Subvocally reading multiple lines at once. The way I learned this originally was by keeping 2 separate voices that read the first and next line at the same time. As they are different voices it is easier to keep track of the order of the sentence verbally. With some added consideration, I think the easiest method to develop this is if you are bilingual. By being bilingual you can translate the second or first line into your native or 2nd language, along with reading the sentence in its original language simultaneously (to an easier extent). The same principle as the initial applies and I can confirm it does go beyond 6, but your peripheral sight starts being a drawback.

You really realize that the adaptation for this has taken place when you hear multiple audio sources and become able to actually process them adequately at the same time, it simply sounds different. Thinking in multiples is difficult but being bilingual or multi lingual makes it much easier because you can’t really cheat yourself this way.

Speed reading- now I know there is pretty much a lot of falsity to the methods out there for speed reading. My thought with speed is really “Why do you need to change your methods to do the same thing faster”. The only real answer to this is if you are not really doing the same thing which isn’t what you want unless it meets the goal. As such I stuck around with sub-vocalization for a bit. While I learned how to read multiple lines at once without cheating, it wasn’t at any state to entirely replace normal reading (yet anyways), hence I will ‘exclude’ it from this. I heard from some posts though skepticism was present, that there were individuals who read at rates of 700-1200 wpm without seeming to cheat a lot. 1200 wpm wasn’t at a pace where people were making movies that perhaps missed a lot of detail out of the words. This said, it was certainly higher than common subvocal rates would meet. I had already gotten my wpm rate to 500 simply through practice but I wasn’t seeing it improve much unless I relearned a faster utterance of every word. Then out of a mix of sources and training I found out that you can make your subvocal voice much quieter or perhaps better said ‘of lower detail’. The end result of this is that it does raise at-least a rate of 500wpm to around 1200 wpm. Lower detail naturally made me assume a lower comprehension, this then that would mean a louder much clearer internal voice meant higher comprehension. Obviously a clearer internal and louder voice did not improve comprehension. In fact, the comprehension of the much quieter voice was actually relatively high. Hence this no name method that somewhat exchanges detail to make reading less brain intensive but also much faster exists. As such I believe it is likely what the others who have high rates of reading have been using. The reason I am stating this being (likely) is because in dual n back, the individuals who commonly set records also describe the ‘silent way of thinking’. Conclusively it is referring to this in a sense.

While the brain is very rhythmic it does prefer to hold more information for less time than it does less information for more time.

Here I was going to name a technique as Accel but it was already called brute forcing before I got to name it, I suppose it was much too late so I will leave that out.

I will at some point add all these techniques as part of my new training journal to improve on them since they are potent. For now I have shared them. I believe Particularly the parallel technique can be more or less applied to anything (though you need to be careful not to task switch). Therefore a spot in memory techniques where I haven’t trailed but will trail it in is encoding multiple ‘things’ at once simultaneously.

Rather than making many small posts I have kept them as a standard single post to avoid spam.

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Thank you for posting that, @Nagime. There’s a lot of information there. I wish you had written several posts rather than one and taken a bit more time to explain each idea. I think that would be welcomed as valuable material and would not be considered spam at all. But as it stands, I have to half guess at what you’re doing. Perhaps more experienced members will get it.

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I was considering writing several posts but I can equally so expand on points in detail as seems appropriate so I have posted it as this for now. If after any detailing everything seems self-explanatory I can make a new post for each technique or idea. Originally I write my sentences very terse and poetically naturally, so I always convert my form of speech to be more understandable.

At what parts do you have to half guess at what I am doing/implying?

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That sounds like an interesting idea, especially for something like memorizing history timelines where you might have a structure with parallel lines.

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Here are the word counts for some sentences in this thread. For comparison, the Reader’s Digest used to have 14 words per sentence, but I notice that it has crept up toi 16.

  • I have actually known and made some of my own techniques which don’t seem to be known so I thought I would share some of what my greed to photographic memory has brought out as techniques especially since I have more techniques now and should start pressuring myself to make more techniques again. [54]

  • First a very simple technique that may already exist is my morph system, essentially this works by using an image, lettering, word, number that you see and you morph it into something that looks relatively close to it, kind of like the shaper system but more of an emphasis on the morphing part which doesn’t entirely ‘have’ to look close to the original. [64]

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  • Thank you for posting that, @Nagime. [6]

  • There’s a lot of information there. [6]

  • I wish you had written several posts rather than one and taken a bit more time to explain each idea. [20]
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A random post from @Josh - one of the clearest writers. It just happened to be the current top of my “All Categories, All Tags” page:

  • Train your brain and learn the Art of Memory in our free discussion forum! [14]

  • This is a discussion forum for people who are interested in memory techniques, brain training, and mental calculation. [18]

  • All levels of experience are welcome! [6]
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Thanks.

Okay I will convert my long sentences into many smaller sentences:

[moved to top post]

@Josh Is there a way to replace my originally posted version with this one? I don’t happen to see the option anywhere.

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Wow :smiley:

What a difference :smiley:

Thanks.

Normally, it’s possible to edit posts, but they are temporarily locked after a couple of hours because spammers have been exploiting it. That editing lock will be removed soon.

I moved your revision to the top post. Send me a message if you would like anything else edited in the meantime.

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700 wpm seems plausible - depending on the material. I was once tested at 600wpm. I can do that on a newspaper but if there’s anything to think about or digest, it slows considerably. I am limited by my cognitive ability, not by my reading speed. That’s reading and comprehending To read material with real information content at 1200wpm and absorb it, I would need to be a lot smarter.

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Can you please expand on your idea of simultaneous addition?

I don’t quite understand what you are trying to communicate. I have been playing with the soroban and thinking that it would be faster to merge the numbers and calculate columns simultaneously. It has a similar flavor to your statement and I am wondering about how you are visualizing your addition.

I have a hard time getting a clear image of the process you are describing here. Do you mean walking through multiple palaces at the same time? Adding or recalling different things in different palaces at the same time?

Since you have been playing with the soroban I will use this as an example.

Rather than moving a single bead at a time you move for example 2 beads at a time. This is quite sensible when you use your fingers because you can physically move 2 beads at a time.

When you are thinking of adding numbers you usually add 1 column at a time, otherwise you add the total that you already know. Simultaneous addition adds 2 or more columns separately at the same time. When you try doing this extremely slowly it becomes noticeably doable, and you do gain speed.

What it essentially does with an addition that has 2 separate steps is, turn it into an addition that has 1 step.

I found you can also do this without a soroban but a soroban definitely makes it much easier to see and do. When you can do it, you can often look at a 2 to n digit addition that you don’t have memorized and instantly see the answer depending on your ability.

This is stated for addition but it does apply to other things too. A soroban really makes it clear to visualize.

Essentially yes. I find this a bit easier to do because I actually learned this by making multiple imaginary memory palaces at the same time.

This meant moving loci at the same time when I do this. It was initially rather difficult but actually gave good results relatively quickly.

I use more of a sticky note screen format, a simple way to visualize it is as, seeing a split screen where 2 different memory palaces are traversed at simultaneously.

Adding and recalling different things in different places at the same time is my next step-up on this.

I find that when I have a single memory palace and a loci and place more than 3 images per loci it becomes harder to recall what the images are, particularly with speed. If however I make multiple memory palaces at the same time it becomes easier to recall the 3 different locations simultaneously with 9 items. This was one of the reasons why I found particular use of doing this.

I suppose this could also work by recalling multiple different memorized memory palaces at the same time, but there may be more resistance to doing this and different purpose.