New Member - Deborah - Southern CA

Hi, I’m a new member currently studying for the CA bar exam - after 10+ years of graduating from law school. I googled “permanent memory palaces” and found this site. I’ve read a couple books on memory techniques but am a newbie. If I can learn how to memorize the law better using memory techniques, I’d be elated!

If anyone has actual hands-on experience using memory techniques for memorizing the law, I’d appreciate comments and suggestions.

Thanks ~

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I use memory palaces on a regular basis for memorizing the key contents of laws, court decisions etc.

What I do is basically use a memory palace where I place the numbers of all articles + a key word that roughly describes the content of the articles. I use the Dominic System for numbers.

Here’s another post I made a while ago where I described how I memorized the contents of specific articles of the Swiss Constitution:

When I memorize a law that way, it helps me find the correct legal basis fast and to understand the structure of the law. It has helped me a lot for my job and for my studies.

If you’d like to memorize for long term you might want to take a look at spaced repetition (here’s an example from my own repetition schedule):

Do you have anything specific you’d like to memorize? I’m happy to help if you post a specific example :slight_smile:

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Welcome, discovery77

Thank you for your responses! I read through your posts and it’s pretty interesting. I had heard of spaced repetition but hadn’t really taken it seriously. I’ll try incorporating it into my studies.

Currently, I’m working off my subject outlines and doing my best to commit rules to memory - mostly IRACs and sub-IRACs. I’m still not very familiar with all of the memory methods - had to look up what PAO was, for example. At the end of the day though, it seems that most of the hard work of learning still needs to be done, but the memory techniques act like a “spotter” to help recall the material.

Hopefully, I’ll become more familiar with the techniques with a little practice - it’s astonishing how much material people seem to memorize! It’s inspiring.

Thanks again!

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Yes, you’ll still have to work hard. But memory techniques will make it easier (especially if you practice them and get more effective with them), you’ll be able to learn more in less time.

The sooner you start to practice on a regular basis, the better. You’ll get very efficient with the techniques if you practice a little bit every day. Almost anything can be memorized in various ways, you’ll soon figure out which memory techniques work best for you.

If you ever come across some information which you don’t know how to memorize, you can always write here on the forum :slight_smile:

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Hard work doesn’t always have to be that hard. There is a danger in pushing too hard and too much. If your brain doesn’t like what your doing, it has a way of dumping stuff. I endorse Silvio’s advice, a little every day can accomplish a great deal without heroic effort. Habits are built up a lick at a time. Not in large chunks.

I commend your enthusiasm. I like it that you are greedy. But IMO it’s best to pick up the techniques one at a time and develop solid proficiency rather than everything you can find. Skills you develop in one method will be relevant in others. You can do a great deal with a simple journey. Do you have a favorite hike? You could probably find 50 locii right there and they are already solid in your head.

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