Memorizing chess boards using binary digits

In computer chess, there is the idea of a “bit board”, which is a binary number with 64 digits. There will be a bitboard for “white rooks”, and it will contain all 0’s, except for two 1’s where the white rooks are located. For example, in the opening position for a game of chess, there are white rooks on the squares a1 and h1, so the bitboard would look like this:

00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
10000001

A few quesitons:

  1. For this kind of data, would you try to memorize it using one of the binary techniques (Ben system, etc)?
  2. Are there any improvements that could be made, knowing that most of the time there will only be one or two 1's out of 64 binary digits?
  3. Or is the best way to just memorize the squares, since there are so few of them?
  4. For pawns, there will be a maximum of eight 1's out of 48 binary digits (pawns can never be on the first or last row). If there is an efficient way to memorize all of the pawns, that would effectively lay out the terrain for the remaining pieces and make them easier to recall.

You could either memorize the two squares, or memorize the number of zeros before the first rook and between the first and second rook. In your example: 56-6

Both of these would only require two two digit numbers.

For pawns, same thing would work.

Bateman