Is it true that fish oil can promote better recall besides memory training?

Hey, I’m just curious. Is anyone here taking vitamins and supplements like fish oil for example to help you recall better?

I have tried most things, the only thing that has promoted some significant benefit is PQQ. Minor benefits from acetyl-l-carnitine too.

Fish oil can promote better recall, perhaps not significantly enough and only over a longer period, however, it definitely hasn’t for me.

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@Nagime. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Great tips. Then, I guess I have to try what works for me.

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Benefits would have to be pretty obvious to claim an effect based on personal experience alone. You would also have to rule out placebo effect which further complicates matters.

Plenty of people think they get benefits from pills when they actually don’t.

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If you use the forum search box to search for “supplements” there are some discussions about them.

A couple of things that do seem to work well are exercise and diet.

I’m not sure if there are any firm conclusions about fish oil. There are some arguments against it here. Here’s one video.

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Personal experience with fish oil tablets:

I take two softgels morning and night. So that’s four per day which amounts to 1600mg EPA, and 1200mg DHA per day.

I should answer why. I take great care as to what I eat and as I live in a country where it’s very difficult to buy fish that does not come from a fish farm, it is easier to just not eat it. So my primary reason for taking the supplement is because of a lack thereof in my diet.

Now, that being said, I have also noticed and it is very obvious when I take the fish oil I never get that “what were we talking about?” experience. It doesn’t happen to me, while I’m the one leading the conversation or when a friend of mine gets distracted and forgets what he was talking about. I can immediately tell him what he was saying. The opposite is also true, when I stop taking the supplement for a week or so, I’m just as lost as what he is and I get distracted just as quickly.

I think people misunderstand the purpose of “supplements”. It’s not going to give you superpowers. If you lack something vital in your diet, then perhaps you can supplement your diet with a supplement. If I could do it all with food, I would.

That’s why what @Josh said is still the best advice, diet and exercise.

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Thank you. Will take these advices from you. Hope I to have a better memory soon

Personally speaking, I used to purchase a medicine from GNC, and it works really well. It helped a lot with brain functioning.(This not an AD) I am still cannot figure whether if it is the placebo effect. But I just remember my attention can be highly concentrated once I ate it. I ate one pile each day when I was preparing the GRE test. The result is good. Meanwhile, the side effect is also significant. Nightmare, hard to sleep, heart attacking…Anyway,the fishing oil seemed unharmful, so i believe you can try if there is no such side effect as my experience.

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I’m not sure if it’s still a problem, but GNC got into trouble a few years ago, because most of their supplements didn’t contain what the labels claimed.

The New York State attorney general’s office accused four major retailers on Monday of selling fraudulent and potentially dangerous herbal supplements and demanded that they remove the products from their shelves.

The authorities said they had conducted tests on top-selling store brands of herbal supplements at four national retailers — GNC, Target, Walgreens and Walmart — and found that four out of five of the products did not contain any of the herbs on their labels. The tests showed that pills labeled medicinal herbs often contained little more than cheap fillers like powdered rice, asparagus and houseplants, and in some cases substances that could be dangerous to those with allergies.

https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/03/new-york-attorney-general-targets-supplements-at-major-retailers/

At GNC, for example, the agency found that five out of six samples from the company’s signature “Herbal Plus” brand of supplements “were either unrecognizable or a substance other than what they claimed to be.” In pills labeled ginkgo biloba, the agency found only rice, asparagus and spruce, an ornamental plant commonly used for Christmas decorations.

https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/03/sidebar-whats-in-those-supplements/

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The only thing that works very well for me is: sleep

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Thank you so much for the information. Appreciate it!

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