Is it bad I wish for this to remain a niche?

I’ve recently gotten into the memory type stuff. I just made an account here and it’s nice to see there’s others who thing it’s interesting as well. But I see people talking about how they’re happy to get lots of media exposure and I can’t help but think that I don’t want there to be lots of exposure because I like little small groups!

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I told my daughter who is in nursing school about memory palaces. She uses them to become one of the top students in her class without putting in the amount of time studying that her classmates are. She is very competitive and wants to graduate with the highest grade. But she is actually sharing her techniques with other students. I’m embarrassed to say I have mixed emotions about this. Apparently she is not as selfish as I am

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I share your opinion, I prefer to be in my own small group, it is productively beneficial for me to be split up like this and attention alone does not bring anything but a waste of time for me.

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That’s very nice!! I’m surprised to see that there are people who agree with my opinion on this! It’s nice to see some people want this to remain a niche too lol. Do you guys have any tips for starting off? I know there are whole threads on it but I’ll ask anyway.

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If you haven’t seen it, there is a Getting Started Guide.

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I can see both sides here. But I wouldn’t worry too much, I don’t think memory techniques will be mainstream any time soon, since it takes some work and practice to use memory techniques efficiently. From my experience, many (if not most) people aren’t willing to put in that work.

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I don’t think any of you have to worry about mnemonics becoming mainstream in your lifetimes. Even if you share your knowledge of memory techniques, it will most likely fall on deaf ears. It certainly did when I first learned about memory techniques. My attempts at introducing memory techniques to others have always failed. The one person who did attempt at using the technique stopped using it after a week.

I think the reason why memory techniques will never go mainstream (at least in America) is because America seems to love the idea of ‘the natural born genius’. Despite our culture preaching that anyone can do what they put their minds to, we don’t really seem to believe it. Despite me telling people over and over that my successes academically are mainly due to mnemonics, people scarcely believe it. In fact, people kinda get pissed off when I say this because they think I’m being condescending and overly humble. Because of this, I don’t think mnemonics will be nothing more than a niche until we get over this sense of biological determinism that seems to be prevelant in American culture.

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I see this a lot too in American culture. While it isn’t everyone, people tend to believe that meager genes determine everything. I am pretty firm on believing that a natural ability is not going to catch up to a refined one of great mastery without any practice of its own. People tend to believe the exact opposite which if I go against, with something like memory techniques they just assume is an excuse. They get angry, and just think that I am only saying this because I am somehow gifted , that I wouldn’t understand it from their position.

So I guess the point is valid in the less likely expansion of mnemonics becoming mainstream.

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Thanks! I’ve read “‘moonwalking with Einstein” and that lead me here and now I’m trying to work on things!

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Good luck, Hayden!
Personally, I would love it if memory techniques went mainstream. Think of how interesting people would be! We’d be surrounded, in real life, with people as interesting as the participants in this group! :grinning:

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If you had just learned to read, wouldn’t you want that for your children too? It’s appalling that we don’t teach memory techniques in school. We’ve had them since ancient times. They were indispensable before the printing press and now we’ve dropped the whole culture. I do wish that would change. I do wish some policy maker would wake up to this glaring omission.

But don’t worry. You are safe. Right now memory techniques is in fad phase. They were a while back too. Lots of lightweight popular books. Methods that give quick and easy results but plateau quickly. Just like diets this comes and goes. Only a few will stick with it.

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The comparison to reading is something I hadn’t considered and actually is making me do a double take. It really is sad we don’t teach techniques like this that have been around since ancient times! Thanks for offering a good analogy for this!

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I wish you good luck in your enterprise. Hope to see you around here.

The point I make about it being a fad is that it gets sold as quick and “easy”. Read this book and you will immediately have superpowers. It is not. It is work and if you want to be really good it’s hard work. What it is, is effective. Many of us have wasted great amounts of effort with poor results. Cramming for exams etc. With memory techniques you get a result for every ounce of effort you put in. They are easy in the sense that the technique is straightforward.

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I am really looking forward to the day when memory technique will be applied in most classrooms. This can help a lot of students take some cramming pressure off. Well, maybe not anytime soon.,

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I think it would be great if students are exposed to it early in their schooling. Maybe 2nd or third grade. Simple mnemonics and peg systems to start with becoming more intricate as they move to higher grades. Combining this with other proven learning techniques like spaced repetition would be awesome.

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Just as support, and perhaps counter intuitively, sharers do better in the long run than non-sharers.

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That’s not counterintuitive. By teaching other people you’re further solidifying the concepts in your mind and therefore you’re better at them.

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My comment actually had less to do with memory techniques and teaching, and everything to do with the mindset of sharing. Sharers do better in the long run than non sharers, even though sharers do more poorly in the short term.

In busines for example, sharers share information and so help everyone including non-sharers get ahead. This costs the sharers in the short term, but in the long term, the sharers have more friends and allies in more places than do non sharers who by definition tend to hoard information in an attempt to get ahead.

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IMO, it’s a balance and can go either way. One has to assess it. If I have a proprietary technique I might not share that though I might share other things. Before modern times if you discovered some, say math technique, often you would not publish rather you’d announce that you were the only one who knew how to predict the flight of a cannonball in windy conditions and sell your services.

I do believe in sharing. I do get a kick out of giving something to others and the benefit it brings to my own clarity is significant.

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Proprietary knowledge is obviously not what a sharing mindset is about.