Improving concept of time

Hi everyone ❨:diamonds:︎.:diamonds:︎❩/:heart:\

I have a quick question. I try to improve my sense of time mnemonically. I want to be able to:

  1. Calculate the number of days and hours since specific date and time.
  2. Find a better mnemonic for number of days in month than conventional poem one.
  3. Know any other idea or system from you that you think maybe can help me.

All I can find online is to tell what day it was on a specific date and that’s not what I need.

Are these… impossible to have a method/mnemonic for?

Thank you so much x

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Things are rarely impossible… but what kind of mnemonics are you looking for? This is just straight up math. What kind of a range are you looking at?

Within the same year all you have to do is determine the day of the year for both and subtract. Anything more than that… a year is 364 and +1 for each leap year.

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Thanks for your reply bjoern.gumboldt :slight_smile: I will try to learn it mathematically like this…

For your question I guess I was wondering if anyone knows of some tricks or system of working it out that I didn’t find. I have no formula or anything. No mnemonic for how many days in months, which ones are leap years, or what is the sequence of months (I know it is embarrassing stupid but no one taught me about time when I was little).

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Then start with that… note down the 0th of each month, which is the same as the last of the previous month:

Jan 0
Feb 31
Mar 59
Apr 90
etc.

Use the #major-system to turn the numbers into images. For example Mar could be elbow. Then when you get Mar-12, you just need to add 12 to elbow (59) and you know that it’s the 71st day of the year.

Leap years are years evenly divisible by 4, like 1984, 2020, 2064. You only need to check the last two digits because 100 is also divisible by 4. When this happens and you are not in Jan or Feb, you need to add +1 to the above mentioned mnemonic.

That‘s really all you can do in terms of mnemonics. There isn’t a shortcut like there is in the day of the week calculation. If something is 10+ years apart you have to start with 365x10 and then adjust for leap years and months from there.

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Does that still work if the year is also divisible by 400? For example, the millennium year?

Thanks.

Especially then… it wouldn’t work if only divisible by 100 but not 400.

I assume that @AliceShields will stay within 1901 and 2099.

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I think I might have screwed up @Josh’s icon system on the default forum page. I submitted the fifth post - but my icon is second in the list. Maybe 2019 is a leap year?

Sorry about that.

Edited: But this latest post bumped it down to third position - which is correct. I’d better delete my account quickly.

:man_facepalming: ahem:
Pope Gregory XIII turning in his grave…

Actually 2019 is a random number.

It came up once as a value on a random number generator I was using.

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That sounds useful.

So, if I guess a number, I can then use that random number generator.

If my guessed number does not come up - then it can’t be random. Simples.

Thanks.

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IMO it could be very handy to know a few random numbers offhand. That way one doesn’t have look up a generator and interrupt one’s train of thought.

After all we are memory specialists. I might suggest that as a project in the Forum - “Memorize The First 100 Random Numbers!”

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Progressive thinking.

It might be a tedious search, so we could share out the work. The odds against any two forum users coming up with the same random number are 2,438,746-to-1.

There was something else I wanted to say - but I’ve forgotten what it was.

Thanks.

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