How to practice visualisation

Hello what book would you recommend for practicing or sharpening visualisation?

What techniques do you use for practicing visualisation?

I would love to hear your opinion on this topic.

Thank you.

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If you want to practice or strengthen visualization skill,then use an online random word or event/fact generator. With each word generated,try to create a visual image in your mind. Or,you can also use other senses like ‘touch,taste,smell’ etc. See how fast you can visualize a word or idea or event. It’s fun!

For generating words: https://randomwordgenerator.com/

For generating events: http://randomfactgenerator.net/

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If you mean pure visualisation without any technique.

For sharpening visualisation I just think in pictures exclusively for a while.For the imagination I guess since I watch anime frequently I don’t have to practice for that. It can also help to turn text into visualisation but thinking in pictures sort of makes this natural.

For example if i try to visualize an apple i would see it more like an computer “ICON” which is outlined shape but i`m missing the colors.

You are saying if you visualise an apple you would see it more like a computer icon, like a 2d small drawing of an apple you mean?

What about if you try to remember(and visualise) an actual apple in your home, does it not look like the apple to you? When you do this try practising by picking it up or visualising that you are picking it up and looking around the apple.

You might also benefit just visualising yourself walking across your room or any locations you know well. (both in first person and third person)

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Great question, Dragan! This could lead to a very helpful conversation.
To sharpen visualisation, I would imagine colors more vividly, exaggeratedly. Red is extreme red. Green, extreme green.
I would bring in other senses as well, though they say sight is the strongest. I would smell the apple, taste it, feel the texture of it.
If there’s an object in my memory palace that I want to link to, I try to notice what’s distinctive about it. It’s not just a generic apple. It’s one of a kind. I’ve noticed details make a thing more memorable for me. Maybe because there’s less interference? A generic apple brings up a whole lot of associations.
But the specific apple in my memory palace needs to link to only one.
I would notice its type. Is it red delicious? granny smith? pink lady? Is the stem on it? Is there a discoloration or indentation? A bruise? I would want to make it very particular. Never a generic apple icon but something that’s one-of-a-kind.

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If you haven’t seen them, there are also some random word generators on our memory training tools page.

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As stated by previous responses, practice visualizing frequently.

The limits of our imagination can be explored and expanded through imagination, which is active use of the internal senses (which correspond to the five external ones, that is).
The visual sense has certain features that you can tweak.
e.g. Picture a tree: how far/ close is it to you, is it monochrome/ colored, is it small/ big, is it in a frozen state/ do you see it moving as in a short movie (like a gif), is the picture bright (and how bright), clear, etc? Details about the ‘tree’ item’s content can also be tweaked: what kinda tree is it, does it have many leaves, is it withered, is it realistic or more video-game-like?

By practicing changing those (and as many as you can find) properties often during visual practice, you’ll find coming up with images somewhat easier, since you’ll get used to intensifying them (or making them duller) within.

Last note: remember that as receivers of info and knowledge, we all prefer one sense a little bit over the others (except taste and smell, perhaps), so it might not feel too comfortable to engage in an otherwise not-so-often-engaged sense (say, if you’re more on the auditory side of things), and it might feel uncomfortable at first, but, let me tell you, it pays off, since at least you’re gradually actually honing your visual sense (inner though it be), meaning it will soon reinforce your learning capacity, if you just keep at it with a good frequency of practice.

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Ok its actually quick thinking in which i get the outline of an object or 2d image.
I was doing some experiments I took a peach was the closest thing i analysed it for 30-60 seconds and then tried to recreate the peach from memory. I found out that if i focus on the object then i can see more. What you said about picking the object helped a lot thanks

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Thanks Carollyn i think the same. I read some books in which the author would mention visualization but there were no examples on how to sharpen it. So that got my interest.

To sharpen visualisation, I would imagine colors more vividly, exaggeratedly. Red is extreme red. Green, extreme green.

A question here do you imagine just the color or the object associated with that color?

I would bring in other senses as well, though they say sight is the strongest. I would smell the apple, taste it, feel the texture of it.

Here i think i was missing an important point i would imagine the object just a picture if i focus onto the object i get a 3d image but i was lacking the other senses.
For example if i would imagine and focus on some object like fruit i would not get the taste, but if i see my self biting that fruit than voila.

But the specific apple in my memory palace needs to link to only one.
I would notice its type. Is it red delicious? granny smith? pink lady? Is the stem on it? Is there a discoloration or indentation? A bruise? I would want to make it very particular. Never a generic apple icon but something that’s one-of-a-kind.

I agree with you in past when i was trying to remember a shopping list I was general with some objects so yes i would remember the object but not know its type unless the object is known to me

Hi, Dragan.
A lot of people recommend having very outrageous images, which are more memorable for being outrageous. I wonder if this operates in a similar way to extreme detail - both outrageousness and extreme detail help distinguish the thing you want to remember from its generic type, which carries lots of associations.
I think of imagining looking at the object with a magnifying glass or even a microscope. What do others think? Is it better to invent outrageous images, does that ultimately yield the best results, the most memorable images? Or could close examination, extreme noticing, be just as effective?

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Hey, Carollyn

A lot of people recommend having very outrageous images, which are more memorable for being outrageous.

Harry loraine in his book “The memory book” mentioned four rules for making pictures ridiculous: Substitution, Out of Proportion, Exaggeration and Action in my opinion this makes it easier to create images that would stick more.

I think of imagining looking at the object with a magnifying glass or even a microscope. What do others think? Is it better to invent outrageous images, does that ultimately yield the best results, the most memorable images? Or could close examination, extreme noticing, be just as effective?

I would like to hear what others have to say on this.

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Hi Dragan, interesting topic :slight_smile:

Some time ago I stumbled across a technique that indeed sharpened my visualization. The pictures in my head became as vivid as real ones. This sounds great, but it has some unpleasant side effects. For example when I tried to visualize a dog, my mind started to create and see not only the overall body shape and surface, but every single hair. It’s probably the best way to burn out your neurons. Thanks god this effect wasn’t permanent.

May I ask what you’d like to achieve with increased visualization?

May I ask what you’d like to achieve with increased visualization?

As i said before sometimes i get 2d images and when i try to make a link it does not stick well. I want to know more how to make them sharper which i believe it would make the images and the links between them stick more so that i can learn the things i`m interested in,
I think overall benefit will be improved memory.

There are more things other than sharper visualisation that can make links stick better.

You can incorporate more senses, make your encoding contain shapes of things you want to remember (direct link), add movement or interaction of the image (tends to form stronger links than sharper visuals do).

Conversely when you focus on these things your visualisation may actually become sharper.

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Hi, Nagime

I appreciate your comment i raised this question in order to find all bits and pieces of information to make it work.

Thanks for contributing.

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From my experience sharpened visualization doesn’t improve memory techniques, unfortunately. Rather the opposite: Seeing the whole picture sharply can make it difficult to remember what part of it is linked to another picture. It is better to focus on just one or two details and use it for the attachment. For example you could use the apple stalk. It isn’t even necessary to see the detail clearly, all you need is the knowledge about it.

But what do I know ^^