How to LIKE reviewing

I hate reviewing. I am bad at making myself do it because I would rather just get on to the new material and learn more, learn faster.

I definitely need a mindset shift in terms of the value reviewing brings - how do you view reviewing in a positive light, and how are you able to convince yourself to review, sometimes more than you are learning something new?

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What are you reviewing?

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I feel this is related to the topic of motivation and habit-formation.

I read something very cool to share. It was about how people get really good at playing games. One of the studies looked at “improvement per match”. Of course, the ones that improved most played a lot. But in terms of efficiency, they noticed the ones who improved the most per match played something around like once per day. There wasn’t a dip in performance until players neglected practicing for more than a few days I think.

The other study looked at habits while playing. The elite players had very consistent ways of pressing buttons – they had hotkeys and shortcuts mapped an practiced. Not just consistent use of hotkeys, but they also issued “dummy commands” just to keep themselves “warmed up” for when they will actually need to do this. Imagine you keep clicking the mouse repeatedly here and there, or checking some place repeatedly, just to be ready to click the mouse when you really need to. So “practice repetition” to stay warmed up at all times helped.

I think for reviewing and motivation that would work: like, every 1-hour, I would take a couple minutes to review. Set a timer. I think that’s pretty doable and could set up a “habit” quickly. Another thing would be imagining that I’m reviewing every few minutes throughout the day, as a “dummy command”. Like, every few minutes remember to review or something. Just some ideas.

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It depends. Lately, I’ve been learning German and using the linking method to memorize vocabulary on my car ride home (a bit risky but it’s a highway drive, so pretty much autopilot). I haven’t really been reviewing a whole lot though, sometimes I’ll recall some of my earlier links but I more or less just keep chugging along.

I also memorize scripture and I have 5 ish memory palaces for five different chapters that I know right now (by the grace of God). But especially with the scripture, I always feel like reviewing will be a bother because most are longer (~25 verses, 1 verse per loci) and so I have it in my mind that I should only review when I have dedicated time to — which defeats the purpose of memorizing scripture in the first place.

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That’s cool. I agree that I’ve heard consistency is key - better to practice for 10 mins / day for 6 days than an hour once in 6 days. Now that you mention it, maybe I will employ the 2 minute rule and see if I can start small with reviewing 2 mins/day.

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I am not memorising a lot, but when I do I find it the most effective to repeat just before Sleep.

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I don’t review unless I forget something.

Let’s say I learn the following information: “Paper was invented by a Chinese man named Cai Lun around 105 AD.”
I read the passage and just go on my merry way. In the future, if I’m in a situation where this information is pertinent but I forgot it, I read similar information elsewhere and realize that I forgot it, or if I’m thinking about the information and I can’t just recall it, then I’ll go about reviewing it again.

Then I’ll put the information in an Anki deck about China and I’ll review all of the other cards I’ve let stay there. That way I only review things infrequently and I don’t have a weight on my shoulders concerning reviewing.

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I was inspired by ehcolston not reviewing.
An idea is to get into a habit of deliberately not reviewing and instead opting to not be picky and “wing it”.
That way you can just try memorizing loads of stuff, and if you forget it – then you don’t worry until you got to the end of all the stuff you want to memorize.
Once you got to the end, you can go back and “pick up the pieces”

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I also did not like reviewing however I think that reviewing is easier than learning and that gave me more dopamine when I used reviewing compared to when I was learning and also I think that I like reviewing with a free spaced repetition application called Note Garden because it’s music,sounds and special effects give me constant dopamine and maybe because of that this is fun and maybe this is why I like reviewing,

And although Note Garden is free now it may become a paid software in the future and so this may be only a temporary solution and if that software gets paid then you will either have to pay or stop using that software and so you may have also have to find ways to like reviewing while you would still be using that software if you would be using it,

Or you can associate pleasure with the action of reviewing and that may make it more likely that you will like reviewing!,

And,

Have a Good Day.

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I use reviews of my memory palaces as a meditation exercise. I just take a few minutes, close my eyes and make a trip through all the loci.

With my daughter it is even simpler. Every three in a row that she has right grants her a bit of candy.

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I will check it out for sure. Will update on how it works for me

I have been trying to involve my family in memory palaces for forever! They all think I’m crazy and that these techniques are just tricks that only certain people should use to memorize.

Whenever I offer them to memorize something they learn through a mnemonic, they say ‘It may work for you, but not for me.’

Understandably, it’s very hard to educate the average Joe on why memory techniques are actually useful.

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About “it may work for you”. from what I seen memory tehnique are truly not best for all, I am not talking about time and effort needed to learn how to use them. Many of them require imagination, with is not easy for everyone, especially if one have already some own method.

Welcome to the club, bud. That being said, the prestige of being a good memorizer/learner within my friend groups is nice.

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You have answered your questions.

Just learn how to love review. It’s the responsibility you need to take for yourself.

Read Mastery book. It’s helpful to understand why we should love practice.

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I try to review in small doses. For instance:
review the loci of one room, with the imagination.
recall the text encoded in one room.
open the remnote app and review some flashcards, usually on Monday.
If I have to review just for 5 or 10 minutes, it is easier to face than reviewing for 1 hour.

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This is an interesting topic. I think what you’re asking is, “how do create and maintain a positive affective experience of my review”? I think one of the challenges is that trying to “convince” yourself is primarily a cognitive, rather than affective, endeavor. You might explore the work of Rick Hanson, where he offers practices to help associate and link positive “feel good” experiences with some activities, such that you might be able to build a habit of feeling good about your review. His book Hardwiring Happiness is a deep dive if you’re curious about exploring more on how deliberately to turn states into traits.

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Mayby selph hypnosis (or attempt to do one) may alter emotional attitude towards reviewing?

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Hey, @Mayarra! When you do those trips, do you think of the content that is encoded in the memory palaces or just the images? And, if you do remember actively the content, do you think/elaborate about it or just review it “as it is”, so to speak? Just curious. Thanks!

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For the people who don’t like reviewing. I like too review manly because I am at a lower skill level and at my level I have too review cause my brain can’t hold on for long and I am not saying that lower level people have too review it’s just it may take a away time but you will get a better chance at better recalls.

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