Dozens of research centers around the country are feverishly trying to understand the most effective ways to prevent big memory problems

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I found more than one interesting thing in this article at Men’s (and women!) health. Here are a few.

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first–ever human trial of an implant that delivers electrical pulses to the brain’s memory center—it enhanced participants’ recall by 37 percent. A team at MIT improved memory in mice by exposing them to a combination of flashing strobe lights and a rapid clicking sound. Even more sci-fi, researchers at both MIT and the French National Centre for Scientific Research successfully inserted false memories into the brains of mice—a feat that proves the malleability of memory. And Facebook and Elon Musk are (separately) working on brain-computer interfaces that may allow our minds to one day merge with digital memory banks.

researchers have begun exposing the cost of our inattentiveness—and have some ideas for keeping our brains on track.

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BEING “ON” MAY TURN MEMORY OFF

SOME OF THE best insight into what we’re up against these days is being revealed at the Stanford Memory Lab, where researchers have devoted considerable time to seeing if and how modern life—specifically, media multitasking—is messing with our memory.

Training your attention is a big piece of the remember-more equation. If you sit in a meeting without making an effort to retain what’s being said, roughly 50 percent of what you hear will disappear in a day or two and 90 percent will be gone within a month…

Deep memory encoding—cementing information into your mind so you can recall it months or years from now—works best when you relate the information to existing memories or knowledge in a meaningful way, says Trelle. Which explains why my friend’s divorce details are still so vivid and why nearly everyone remembers what they were doing on 9/11.

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I 'm not trying to be insulting to whoever wrote this, but it sounds like hogwash to me. Remembering 50 % of what is being said makes you a memory champion in my estimation (and that is without even trying to remember). And what on earth does a person that tries to remember do different from a person that doesn’t, when that person hasn’t learned any memory methods? The answer: pay more attention. That only works when the person that doesn’t try to remember isn’t also paying maximal attention to the meeting because he or she is interested in what is being said.

Deep memory encoding—cementing information into your mind so you can recall it months or years from now—works best when you relate the information to existing memories or knowledge in a meaningful way, says Trelle. Which explains why my friend’s divorce details are still so vivid and why nearly everyone remembers what they were doing on 9/11.

So evidently memory encoding is cementing information into your mind. This is really helpful in understanding the working of the human brain (sarcasm hihihi). And it can be done deep and not so deep (or shallow like the Lady Gaga song).

Some thoughts about the “everyone knows what he or she did at 9/11” meme. I honestly have no idea what I was doing and I suspect the same is true for many others, but admitting to this may have consequences, as it may be regarded as a sign of not caring about the victims of the attack. Also the meme itself may have a selffulfilling prophecy nature given that every time someone hears or reads it, he or she will be remembering that information.

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