Am I doing it wrong


#1

I am new to memory techniques and I’m trying to memorize some research papers for my masters program. Im coming up with images to memorize text, but I’m writing down a description of the images and what they’re doing and what other images are they interacting with. It is taking more time than I thought. Am I doing it wrong? am I not supposed to write the visualizations down? If so how would I revise them later? How can I speed up my memorization?


(Silvio B.) #2

No. You’re not doing anything wrong :slight_smile:

I do the same when I want to learn something for long term use (for me, that’s mostly laws and jurisdiction). In the beginning, it took much more time to learn something with memory techniques than it does now. You get faster the more you train memory techniques and especially by using them to learn the information that is useful specifically to you. The hardest part is often to come up with images for abstract information, which you can also train by memorizing random words (for example on memory league).

I wouldn’t try to rush during memorization for things you’d like to remember for more than a few weeks. If you take your time to memorize it properly and then review with spaced repetition, you save time in the long run.

I’ve started using excel-spreadsheets to write down my notes on things I memorized. After a while, I’ve become quite efficient that way.

The information I put in my excel-spreadsheets is:

  1. The information (sometimes very detailed, sometimes not so much)
  2. The keyword I need to remember the information
  3. The image(s) I use for the keyword (+ the people from my number system if numbers are involved)
  4. The memory palace I use for it / the location in the palace
  5. Sometimes additional notes

This way, I can review all of it quite quickly.


#3

Thank you. :star_struck:


#4

Don’t be so hard on yourself. There is quite a learning curve. You will become fast with practice. When I started memory techniques I had ZERO ability to visualize anything, much less memory palaces.

Are you reducing your papers to an outline and then trying to memorize the outline?


#5

There exists the very valuable PDF “How To Develop A Super Power Memory” by Harry Lorayne in the internet for free download. Amazon sells the book version. Especially §48 is useful. I myself work with a 100-Peg-System.
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 are read as: tie, Noa, Mao, rye, law, shoe, cow, fee, bee, sea. That’s all you need to begin with.
Study the §48 and let me know if you succeed.


#6

Hi
I’m with SilvioB. Been doing this for decades.
For important info that I don’t wish to lose and have to re remember I draw ( on a tablet and backup) the palace, the key word info everything.
It takes time but without a doubt in the long run it saves hair pulling frustration. if I don’t record in this manner, in the future I inevitably have to redraw often having to memorize very different images than before and that wastes time.
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